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The Domestic Impact of the First World War


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The domestic impact of the First World War: The human experience, Germany


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The war had a devastating impact on German society. 2.4 million died, and many more were permanently disabled, physically and/or mentally. During this period real wages collapsed. By 1918 railwaymen earned 83.9% of their 1913 income, printers earned 54.1%, miners earned 63.7%, and civil servants earned 55.0% of their 1913 income. After the war there was a massive eruption of social unrest, and, whilst strikes accounted for only 1.86 million working days lost in 1917 in 1919 this figure rose to 33.08 million working days lost. At first the shortages were only perceived to be inconveniencies, but pessimism set in from Autumn 1916 onwards. There was a rise in civilian deaths from 121,000 in 1916 to 293,000 in 1918. Solidarity between classes did not develop, and social unrest increased. The working classes saw the industrial classes as "sharks" who made huge profits whilst others suffered
Contents of
The Domestic Impact of the First World War

1 The domestic impact of the First World War: Political truce in 1914
2 The domestic impact of the First World War: German Dictatorship
3 The domestic impact of the First World War: The human experience, Germany
4 The domestic impact of the First World War: The human experience, France
5 The domestic impact of the First World War: The human experience, Italy
6 The domestic impact of the First World War: The human experience, Britain
7 The domestic impact of the First World War: Dislocation of state finances
8 The domestic impact of the First World War: Anti-war movement

Related articles: (1) The First World War, (2) The Domestic Impact of the First World War